Sunday, 26 February 2012

Vintage knitting patterns - 'Bedjacket'

Deep in the horde of knitting patterns I 'inherited' on Friday, was a little pattern booklet from what looks like the late 1950's, perhaps the early 1960's. The patterns are for two bed-jackets - basically, loose, lacey cardigans that could be worn in the evening or before going to bed. I love these types of patterns, because the shapes are fairly neutral and the patterns themselves often employ nicer lace and more complex shaping than the cardigans of the time.

Anyway, I've decided to try and knit one of these two patterns as a cardigan for spring and summer. 

Here's a picture of the one I've chosen

She appears to be preparing to swallow a whole humbug with a finger of scotch. Great days, the 1950's.
Minus the ribbon that's a nice little cardigan! It's knitted sideways for the lower section, then the yoke is picked up from the side of the body. Sleeves are knitted seperately, cuff-up, and sewn on after. The bottom of the main peice, both fronts and the neck are edged in picot, which is picked up and knittd from the edge of the body.


The pattern calls for 4-ply yarn, in both a fuzzy and a smooth type. I'm considerng my options, but I may go for King Cole Haze, allegedly a DK but feeling much finer, in 'Pewter', which is a pale warm grey. 

The main issue, as always with vintage patterns, is the size. This pattern is one size for a 35" bust, but the open front helps, as does my choice of DK yarn. Of course, the pattern's knit sideways so there's lots of room for adjustment by including extra repeats across the front and body. it's designed to be long on the body, so the depth is not a problem - around 21" from shoulder-seam to hem seemed fine on me. 

I've made notes on the pattern, translated the odd terms, and created a new chart for the lace - I hate knitting written directions for lace, espeically when they use obsolete terms. You can download a copy here, if you're so inclined; 

http://freepdfhosting.com/0b3f29bb0f.pdf






  

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